Vietnam Health & Quarantine

In transit - Infectious Diseases

Filariasis: This is a mosquito-borne disease that is very common in the local population, yet very rare in travellers. Mosquito-avoidance measures are the best way to prevent this disease.


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In transit

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) occurs when blood clots form in the legs during plane flights, chiefly because of prolonged immobility. The longer the flight, the greater the risk. Though most blood clots are re-absorbed uneventfully, some may break off and travel through the blood vessels to the lungs, where they may cause life-threatening complications.


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Before you go - Internet resources

Before you go - Internet resources


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Before you go - Vaccinations

The only vaccine required by international regulations is yellow fever. Proof of vaccination will only be required if you have visited a country in the yellow-fever zone within the six days proor to entering Vietnam. If you are travelling to Vietnam from Africa or South Africa you should check to see if you require proof of vaccination.


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Before you go - Insurance

Health issues and the quality of medical facilities vary enormously depending on where and how you travel in Vietnam. Many of the major cities are now very well developed, although travel to rural areas can expose you to a variety of health risks and inadequate medical care.


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Traditional Medicine

A number of traditional medical treatments are practised in Vietnam. Herbal medicine, much of it imported from China, is widely available and sometimes very effective. As with Western medicine, self-diagnosis is not advisable - see a doctor. Traditional Chinese doctors are found wherever a large Chinese community exists, including HCMC, Hanoi and Hoi An.


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Women’s health

Women’s health Pregnant women should receive specialised advice before travelling. The ideal time to travel is in the second trimester (between 16 and 28 weeks), during which the risk of pregnancy related problems is at its lowest and pregnant women generally feel at their best. During the first trimester there is a risk of miscarriage and in the third trimester complications such as premature labour and high blood pressure are possible. It’s wise to travel with a companion


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Environmental hazards

Air Pollution Air pollution, particularly vehicle pollution, is an increasing problem in most of Southeast Asia’s major cities. If you have severe respiratory problems speak with your doctor before travelling to any heavily polluted urban centres. This pollution also causes minor respiratory problems such as sinusitis, dry throat and irritated eyes. If troubled by the pollution leave the city for a few days and get some fresh air.


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In transit - Traveller’s diarrhoea

Traveller’s diarrhoea is by far the most common problem affecting travellers - between 30% and 50% of people will suffer from it within two weeks of starting their trip. In over 80% of cases, traveller’s diarrhoea is caused by a bacteria (there are numerous potential culprits), and therefore responds promptly to treatment with antibiotics. Treatment with antibiotics will depend on your situation - how sick you are, how quickly you need to get better, where you are etc.


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